Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Shaping the Brain


Not too long along researchers identified a crucial gene that influenced cell shape and growth. That is to say, researchers discovered that neuron growth and connections are altered by the expression of the srGAP2 gene. What this may lead to are breakthroughs in brain science, and greater understanding of brain development and disorders.

It appears that "neuron networking" is influenced by the expression of srGAP2 - it can interfere or influence connections. This in turn shapes how the brain communicates and operates and a multiplicity of levels.

Below is a link to one of many articles on the related research, and following that is a link to an informative article about neurons that might help put things in perspective.


Science Daily

The Nervous System

4 comments:

Rick said...

"They then cultured brain slices in petri dishes allowing researchers to watch how the neurons behaved ’in the wild’ in their native environment." The concept of observing neurons in the wild is too much for my head.

I know, however, that you will not be surprised when I add there is ongoing research into the relationship between blood gas concentrations and gene expression. Bogdon, for example, has produced a significant body of research regarding the biochemical mechanism behind nitric oxide's ability to regulate the expression of eukaryotic genes. The underlying implication is that the expression of certain genes can be initiated or perhaps even terminated by the electrochemical environment of the body.

Charles Gramlich said...

Neurons in the wild. Love that. Nitrous apparently can act as a neuromodulater. Lots of new stuff being discovered in our closest last frontier.

Rhys-Lain-Austurias said...

This post very out of place on this blog XD.

It is comforting to know that the knowledge of what goes on in the human nogin is growing.

-Rhys

Steve Buchheit said...

Okay, did anybody other than me hit "F-BAR domain" and double check to see when the article was posted?

And the image of brain cells clawing their way into position in the young mind using their filopodia is just to delicious to not include somewhere.